Half Naked Interviewing

By: Ryan Delmar

200297077-002I was in a freakishly thin medical gown waiting for my physician, Dr. Eric Southard, to hold a routine physical.  Thinking about my recent lack of interviews for my assignment involving swine-flu, I knew Dr. Southard has an excellent medical opinion.  I was half-naked on a uncomfortable bench as he walked in to meet his newest patient.  I was nervous about asking him a few questions in a somewhat awkward situation but the swine-flu is a health threat so it’s solving two problems at once; my health concerns and a class project.

The domination of this exchange was easily held by the man in clothing.

He asked if anything new was going on and I immediately jumped into the conversation of swine-flu and thankfully he was willing to share some insight.  For about 30 minutes.  It most likely did not feel like an interview to him, but I was asking questions that would help me better my assignment.  I informed him that it was for an assignment and he gladly gave me further research on the subject.  I was also without my pad to write notes on.  It was in my jacket pocket, hanging on the wall.  He left the room and I quickly jotted my notes down.  I’ll save the details of my exchange for my Assignment 1 project, but I will tell you that his expert opinion was a great help to my project.

It was an odd way of interviewing, but I knew it would be my easiest and most effective way to get a doctor to see and converse with me.  Hopefully for my next interview I will have pants on.

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One response to “Half Naked Interviewing

  1. Content: 4 You made me stop and laugh, which is amazing considering how crazy busy I am these days. Yes, one good lesson of journalism is that everything becomes a subject for interviews/ideas. (Nora Ephron even took notes at her mother’s deathbed!)
    There are some rough spots in the execution of this post — phrasing that could be tighter and more effective. For instance:

    Thinking about my recent lack of interviews for my assignment involving swine-flu, I knew Dr. Southard has an excellent medical opinion.

    This sentence is all turned around. Remember subject verb do.
    I was thinking about my assignment and few interviews I had managed to get, when I had an idea: I was in a medical office, why not interview the doc?

    I was half-naked on a uncomfortable bench as he walked in (to meet his newest patient). Why do you need this? Obviously you are the newest patient.

    I was nervous about asking him a few questions in a somewhat awkward situation but the swine-flu is a health threat so it’s solving two problems at once; my health concerns and a class project.

    Again, the thoughts here are jumbled. The idea is good — great, even — but the execution is weak and draws juice from your content.

    Say something like: I was nervous talking to him wearing only paper. But I knew he had answers I needed, both about my health problems and about swine flu. I had to ask.

    Do you see the difference?

    Links: 1 This is a weak link! Why not link to something about swine flu? Or doctor-patient relations or something else??? This doesn’t have any value for me, the reader.

    Grammar: 3

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