A Voice of a Writer: Amanda Woods

amandaAmanda Nicole Woods, a 20-year-old aspiring reporter, lands a job last summer with a Christian blog, Revelife.com.

Amanda is from Brooklyn, New York. She is studying Journalism at the University at Buffalo.

Last summer, Amanda’s chief editor, Eric Corpus requested she write about controversial issues of denominational organizations and the relations between church and state. Amanda did as told and in effect, the blog spurred mass attention. The readers posted responses and interrogative comments, which propelled her argument’s intensity. Her blog culminated critic acclaim and soared ratings and views. Amanda was left in awe. She questioned the effect of her message and its perception among readers. Amanda said, “ I felt guilty, I felt as if I was dividing people instead of uniting them.”

Bearing an equivocal attitude toward her post, Amanda proceeded to blog about contentious issues in addition to her own. She covered sexual matters and prompted question toward the rights and wrongs of social issues in Christian faith. An experience that she considered “dirty and demeaning”, Amanda said.

Her editor, Eric recognized her estrangement with his proposed topic, therefore he limited controversial topics to every other post. Still ambivalent about her role as a reporter, Amanda looked toward proportionately dividing topics that seemed too controversial and opinionated. And in virtue of her precarious writing, Amanda was able to improve her writing skills, challenge her social creed and transgress beyond religious opinion.

Advertisements

One response to “A Voice of a Writer: Amanda Woods

  1. Lead: 3 You have the right instinct here, but you change tense often and confuse the reader. You start with her landing a job in the present tense, then by paragraph three you are in the past tense (her editor asked her) The sense of time is way off. If you want, print this out and we can review it together.
    Interviewing: 2 You have the backbone of the story, but no flesh. What did she write about exactly. That makes me think you didn’t ask enough questions. What made her uncomfortable about the assignment? How did she resolve it? What did she write? Why did she consider the experience dirty and demeaning — this is intriguing but you leave it unexplained.

    Grammar/style 2 Your language is obscure and doesn’t help me understand what the issues are. Be clear.

    For instance: Her editor, Eric recognized her estrangement with his proposed topic, therefore he limited controversial topics to every other post.

    How about: Her editor, Eric, saw that writing about xx made her uncomfortable and only had her write about controversial subjects every other post.

    Still ambivalent about her role as a reporter, Amanda looked toward proportionately dividing topics that seemed too controversial and opinionated.

    I don’t know what this means. What are proportionately dividing topics?

    And in virtue of her precarious writing, Amanda was able to improve her writing skills, challenge her social creed and transgress beyond religious opinion.

    What do you mean here? What is precarious writing?
    How did she challenge her social creed and trasgress beyond religious opinion? Write how you speak. It will help the reader.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s