Busy-Bee: Chris Ryndak

By: Ryan Delmar

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It must be hard to find time when you are Chris Ryndak.  This UB senior is double majoring in English and Legal Studies, writing for the Spectrum and a Buffalo sports blog titled “The Gooses Roost” on WNYMedia.net, while also working at UBMicro.  With all of this activity filling Chris’ life, he still finds time to assistant coach a soccer team at the Kenan center in Lockport, his hometown.

“I’m a soccer coach, but I hate kids” he stated in a recent interview.

An incident with a certian player may have built up this perspective, as his team was playing a game down 6-1 when a player missed an open net.  The frustration of not scoring got the best of this young player as he then kicked and punched the goal post.  Cursing himself for missing, the ref gave him a red card and was ejected from the game.  The players continuing rage then persisted to the bench, kicking water bottles and ignoring Coach Ryndak’s requests to sit and calm down.  The ref was forced to even eject the player from the building.  The player was kicked out of the next game, a playoff game in which they eventually lost.

When asked about his career plans he says, “I have no idea”.  Journalism or not, he hopes he finds “satisfaction in whatever it is I do”.

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One response to “Busy-Bee: Chris Ryndak

  1. Lead: 4/4 Good lead. Like the way you teased me with the first short line, then grabbed me with the second longer one. Notice how your second line both describes what Chris does and emulates his life (long and full)? That’s an advanced writing technique. Did you even know you were doing it?

    Storytelling/interviewing: 2/3 The art of interviewing is asking the right questions. The content of your story reflects how good your questions were. Here, I don’t understand what the incident meant to Chris. You tell the story and then drop it without explaining Chris’ reaction or what it taught/showed him. That leaves me hanging.

    Also, why does Chris coach soccer? He’s so busy already. Why does he make time for it? What thrill does it give him? Why coach rather than play? All these questions matter and help form the story you are writing.

    Grammar: 2/3 Goose’s Roost, player’s
    Never use the phrase, “said in a recent interview.” Just say said.
    Also, never use the question as a lead-in to the answer (“when asked about his career plans…)
    You are a writer. Find a better way to lead in.

    Also, watch wordiness:

    Sports offers a chance for writing to soar. Use strong verbs. Paint the picture.

    An incident with a certian player may have built up this perspective, as his team was playing a game down 6-1 when a player missed an open net.

    Once, his team was down 6-1 and Johnny, a great athlete with a matching temper, (GIVE NAMES AND DESCRIPTIONS WHEN POSSIBLE — IT PERSONALIZES THE STORY) missed an open net.

    He kicked the goal post. He punched the goal post. He stomped around swinging his arms wildly in the air (or whatever happened.)

    The frustration of not scoring got the best of this young player as he then kicked and punched the goal post.

    Cursing himself for missing, the ref gave him a red card and was ejected from the game.

    THIS SENTENCE SAYS THE REF WAS EJECTED FROM THE GAME

    The players continuing rage then persisted to the bench, kicking water bottles and ignoring Coach Ryndak’s requests to sit and calm down.

    On the bench, Johnny fumed. He kicked over water bottles. He paced. He ignored Ryndak when he told him to sit and calm down.

    See the difference?

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